U.s. Hockey Hall Of Fame, The Game Must Go On

The cases were payment from President Barack Obama who bet Harper that the U.S. men's hockey team would beat Canada in the gold medal game at the Vancouver Olympics. The taste of victory for Canada must have been sweet. The 3-2 Olympic overtime U.S. upset against Canada on February 28 still lingers in the minds of many U.S. hockey fans. It was so close. Despite the disappointment, the U.S. men's hockey team played well and had a great run. The game must go on.

The U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame is still accepting nominations from the public for the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2010. USA Hockey called last year's class one of its best classes of inductees. The undefeated 1998 U.S. Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Team represented by team captain Cammi Granato won the first Olympic gold medal in women's hockey in Nagano, Japan, defeating number one team Canada, twice. The team was credited with being a major contributor to the growth of girl's and women's hockey in the United States and remains an inspiration.

Tony Amonte, a 15-year NHL veteran spent his career playing for five teams, including the Philadelphia Flyers. His most memorable moments, however, are at the international level. At the inaugural World Cup of Hockey in 1996, Amonte scored the series-clinching goal with two and a half minutes left against Canada.

Goaltender Tom Barasso was the winner of consecutive Stanley Cup titles with his team the Pittsburgh Penguins in 1991 and 1992. He went straight into the NHL immediately after graduating from high school and had an amazing first season that won him recognition (and trophies) as both the NHL's top goalie and rookie.

John LeClair also played for the Pittsburgh Penguins but is most known as the first U.S.-born player to score 50 goals three years in a row and is recognized as the winner of the Stanley Cup title in 1993 with the Montreal Canadiens.

Last but not least is an inductee of the 2009 class who has never actually played hockey. The late Frank Zamboni is the inventor of the modern ice resurfacer, the first self-propelled resurfacing machine of its kind. His son, Richard Zamboni accepted the award on behalf of his father who passed away in 1988.

Including the 2009 class, which was recognized on December 1st 2009 in Boston, there are now 143 enshrined members in the 1973-founded U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame. March 31st was the official deadline for the Class of 2010 nominations.

Unfortunately, with the winter Olympic season now at a close, the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame cannot boast of an Olympic win or any of the keepsakes that may have come with it. Despite the disappointment, the U.S. men's hockey team played well and had a great run. The game must go on. The U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame is still accepting nominations from the public for the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2010. USA Hockey called last year's class one of its best classes of inductees.

I've done my share of writing, as a sports columnist, a freelancer and blogger. I've tried my hand at everything from writing the great American novel to scribing the minutes of monthly board meetings. Desperate times call for desperate measures, eh?

One day I'll get my big break... Maybe not. But at least, after all is said and done, I'll get to say that I've spent an entire career, an entire lifetime, writing, breathing, and living sports. And isn't that the American dream? Check out my blog dedicated to all things sports, Sports Action Today, and my hockey blog US Hockey Hall. Add me on Facebook if you want a friend who won't shut up about sports!

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